Wireless Setup on the Pandaboard

Having given the Pandaboard a battery pack the only wire that remained connected to it was the Ethernet cable. I had hoped that simply switching to using WiFi, something that the Pandaboard has built-in, would be an easy task, however I could not have been more wrong.

Firstly it took me almost a day to get the WiFi working on the Pandaboard, I tried a large number of guides all asking you to install and do different things but to no avail. The guide I finally used which worked was the one available here, for which there is a video available via a link at the top of the section. A useful resource for configuring the /etc/network/interfaces file (which I sadly found after working it out myself) can be found here. I should also point out that I have to perform an additional restart of the network interface via the command:

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

I’m not sure why this is, however I had spent far longer than I wanted to setting it up so I decided to just accept it and added the line to the end of the /etc/rc.local file which is automatically run on start up.

I then needed to install git on my laptop, which had been running Ubuntu 10.11, however as it has been discontinued the repositories were unavailable. I therefore decided to upgrade to Ubuntu 12.10, though after many hours of research I found that my Laptop’s WiFi card (a Broadcom BCM4311) was unsupported and none of the numerous fixes listed worked. I then downgraded to 12.04 but had the same problem (again after many hours messing around). I worked my way back through the versions until I eventually settled on Ubuntu 10.04 (a Long Term Support release), which worked. This whole process took over 2 days.

A final caveat is that Ubuntu 10.04 does not support Ad Hoc networks secured with anything other than WEP, something that I was unable to get the Pandaboard to connect to after several attempts. My solution was to use an old smartphone as a Wireless Hotspot (secured with WPA2) and connect to it from both the laptop and Pandaboard. As this assigns different addresses each time you connect to it so I wrote a short script to run on the Pandaboard each time it boots up to locate the laptop and save its address. I also synchronise the system clock with the Laptop’s as, since I disconnect the battery pack when not in use, it does not stay up to date.

I now have everything working, and I intend to have as little to do with Linux’s wireless networking in the future as possible.

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